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Popular Canadian Fishing Destinations

By Charles Hopkins Published 04/26/2006 | Fishing and Boating

Canada is the second largest country in the whole world, right after Russia, and it is not surprising that it is one of the richest countries in terms of natural resources. The landscape is greatly varied from one end of the country to another. Its forests, mountains, rivers, lakes, cliffs and lagoons make it a nature lover's paradise. It is also home to some of the greatest fishing destinations of the world.

The provinces of Ontario and Quebec are famous for their great water systems, and the rivers of British Columbia are legendary. The vast country has a smallish population that is very sparsely distributed, and as a result there are many water bodies across the land that have virtually never known the fisherman's hook. Naturally, the number and sizes of their denizens are absolutely fabulous!

Ontario and Quebec border on the Hudson Bay, so expectedly their saltwater fishing resources are formidable. But the real attraction for serious-minded anglers in these two provinces lies in their incredible sweet water lakes. In Ontario alone there are over two hundred thousand lakes, and most of them are chock-full of eager and aggressive fish! These two places can also boast of a bewildering variety of fish walleyes and muskies, pikes and trouts, salmon and bass if you can name it, you can probably get it here.

The two provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan look land-locked on the map, and indeed they are called the 'prairie provinces'. But if that makes you think these aren't good fishing destinations, you need to think again. These two places offer some of the finest fly-fishing experiences ever. The trout fishing in the Bow river of Alberta is unparalleled on the continent. The two-hundred-odd fishing camps of Saskatchewan offer, in addition to trout, great catches of pike and walleye. Selwyn Lake, Oliver Lake and Angler Rapids are some of the most famous resorts, but there are many more that are so remote and undisturbed that they can't be reached by car, but by boat or float plane only.

The people of the far north province of Yukon regard angling as a prized tradition and their life's passion. And why not indeed the sweet water reserves of Yukon offer no less than eleven distinct species of game fish, and four different species of salmon swim into its rivers every year to lay eggs. There is even a rare salmon species here that lives in land-locked lakes!

The brand new territory of Nunavut (formed 1999) is a large place that covers about 20% of the country's total area. It is a land of great geological variety, from shallow lakes to fjords and from icebergs to great mountains. The main point of attraction for anglers is the abundance of the much-sought-after arctic char, widely regarded as the top game fish of the world.

As a visitor to Nunavut, you must remember that this is new and undeveloped country, and you will find little in the way of local support mechanism. There are countless fabulous spots for char fishing dotted about the region, but if you choose any remoter place than the three official lodges, you shall probably need to fly in all that you shall need.