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Raising the question: How to ask for a raise

By Charles Hopkins Published 05/7/2006 | Jobs and Careers

As you have been toiling in your desk, you must have spend months wondering when your boss will call you to his room and congratulate you on your raise. Unfortunately that day has never come. And now you think you could well do with some addition to what you have been taking home all these months. But then again you dont know how to actually go about it. You think it might be too awkward. Yes it is. If you are not prepared. But if you follow the hints enlisted below, you can have it much easy.

Before you go asking for a raise, you must actually assess the state the company is in. if your organization is making huge losses and is struggling to keep up with the times, asking for a raise might be considered as being insensitive to the organizations situation. Or if the company is going through a particularly tough legal battle, which has kept the top management busy, asking for a raise then would also do more harm than good. So when you are going to talk about your raise, you have to be very prudent while choosing the moment and the method.

  • Before you ask for a raise, you must evaluate your worth for the company. If you think you havent been doing anything special, or more worse have not performed up to the mark the company had set for you, then asking for a raise might be a bit foolhardy. If instead you think you have been pretty successful in handling your duties and have put in the best efforts to make the company tick, then you have all the reasons to ask for a raise, now that you spent some considerable time in the office. Make a list of all your achievements and contributions so that you can cite them as and when required.
  • Get proper information regarding the industry standards. Collect data as to what is the normal raise that any other individual gets in your industry with a similar work experience as yours. this would help you to substantiate your claim.
  • Dont go in just any day and ask for a raise from your boss or supervisor. Make sure he is in a pleasant mood and will consider your claims genuinely. Dont rush things. If you think it will help if you wait for that extra week, it is better to wait.
  • While asking for the raise, claim more than what you think you will get. There would be rounds of negotiations where you will have to take a few steps back. Asking for a higher raise you ensure you get what you were expecting even after the negotiations.
  • If you are offered perks or flextime or a vacation, you should not reject it outright, and instead consider the offer. You can always ask for time to think about it, and then choose to accept or reject it.
  • During the negotiation process never lose your calm. Try and be pleasant and make an effort to convince your supervisor that providing you with a raise would help you perform even better than he has been doing for so long.