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Give your child a friendly workspace

By Charles Hopkins Published 06/2/2006 | Education

Though the learning process begins at school it by no means stops at the school. It continues even when the child is at home. To make sure that the child makes full use of his time at home assign him a separate study. If that is not possible, create a study corner in his bedroom.

The selection of study space depends on many factors. The most important is to plan according to your childs study habits. If the child is easily distracted then a secluded place or an independent room is the best option. However, if the child works best when surrounded by family members then you can create space in the living room. The dining area can also be used. However, distractions like music and television must be removed from these rooms.

The study space should have bright lighting, relative quiet, and close-at-hand supplies. The study table should be up to the waist-level. It should have a large working surface and drawers for storing stationary and keeping books. The seat should be comfortable to sit for long hours.  The height of the chair should be raised so that the legs do not dangle in air. You can even provide pillows for lumber support. When your child sits down to write or study, the arms should rest comfortably on the table and the elbows should be bent at an angle of ninety degrees or more. A swivel chair is the best for your child since its height can be adjusted. It also ensures proper posture.

You must involve the child in building the study space. A child may like to have her teddy bear or a doll nearby or another may like a magic hat to support him while solving math problems. Often children work best when they are allowed to incorporate play and fantasy into their daily routine.

If your child is using a computer make sure you have a computer table. The monitor should be placed at head level and should face the child. Use an anti glare screen to cut out the glare from the monitor, and use a keyboard and mouse that are specifically designed for younger kids.

Ensure that all study aids required by the child are provided. The child should not be hunting for pens and pencils during the study hour. Use colorful holders to stock pens, pencils and scissors and the gum tube. Stock the table with a copy of an atlas, thesaurus and a globe. These are useful aids, and make studies more enjoyable.

For kids who work at the dining table or in the living room, get a pencil box to store all the stationery. A table or wall calendar can be used by the child to write assignment dates. The telephone numbers of your childs classmates too should be pinned or pasted in the study room so that he can call his friends in case of doubt.

The child feels important when you create a workspace for him. It will motivate him to deliver good results.