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The Psychology of Halloween Arts and Crafts

By Charles Hopkins Published 08/8/2006 | Kids & Teens

Halloween to most is nothing more than a popular kids holiday. To others, Halloween can take on further significance and importance. Now, the people who empower Halloween with further importance do not necessarily have to be members of the lunatic fringe, but rather, even the person on the street can draw far more significance from Halloween than it seemingly has.

One of the ways these significance is externalized is through the arts and crafts that create the visible symbols of Halloween. More than just mere paper and cardboard cutouts.

One of the most common psychological issues that deals with monsters and mysteries involve the disempowering of ones nightmares. That is, horror related entities represent repressed fear and internalized nightmares. When one is able to minimize or handle a horror related item, in this case, in the form of Halloween arts and crafts, it takes away the psychological power it has over its handler. This removal of power from a symbol of deep, suppressed nightmares is an incredibly empowering thing.

Also, Halloween arts and crafts can also represent the dream world of the inner child. That is, being a child goes hand in hand with a sense of wonder and limitless potential. When confronted with a supernatural symbol, there is generally dismissal of the symbol. However, certain symbols, be it movies, television programs, etc, provide symbols that adults may hold on to. By holding on to the symbols, they hold on to the wonderment, amazement and limitless potential of being a child. Halloween arts and crafts provide another venue for the symbols to be displays, owned and maintained by adults still holding on to childhood.

The third item that Halloween arts and crafts can symbolize is that of that of a mild belief in the wonders of the invisible world. Or, put in more pragmatic terms, the possibility of a world existing outside and beyond the mundane pragmatism of reality that people must live in everyday. When one lives there life by the limits of pragmatism (whether the limits are real or imagined), there can be a sense of boredom, complacency, or limitation imposed internally. By looking beyond the realm of the pragmatic and into the superstitious, one can convince oneself that perhaps there is more to the world beyond the perceived limits of reality by expanding reality to include a mystery. In this case the mystery borrows from the world of the supernatural and does so by creating a face in the supernatural through Halloween images and these images are brought into reality by way of arts and crafts that create icons to it.

While some may dismiss empowering symbols to be nonsense and an escape from the real world, others find it a safe method of internal introspection and psychoanalysis. Which one is accurate? There is not real answer. In actuality, it is up to the person himself to validate or invalidate the concept. Granted, most may not even truly think much about it and prefer to put their beliefs into action whether they are truly aware of them or not.