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Skiing Styles

By Charles Hopkins Published 01/19/2007 | Sports

There is a great deal more to the sport of skiing than just sliding down a hill on two planks. Skiing is an interesting, exhilarating, and challenging sport. There are numerous different styles of skiing to choose from so it doesnt have to be the same old thing over and over again.

Alpine Skiing is essentially downhill skiing. This type of skiing may combine other types of skiing as well. Alpine skiing is where all beginner skiers start out doing, and this is what is taught in ski lessons for beginners.

Cross Country Skiing is also done by beginners, and it is the easiest and least expensive form of skiing to get into. Cross country skiers do not seek slopes. They seek trails. Its like hiking but on skis in the snow.

Telemark Skiing refers to a special turning technique, but alpine skiers and cross country skiers may also be Telemark skiers. In fact, any type of skiing may use the Telemark techniques, but not all types of skiing are suited to the special skis that are used for Telemark skiing.

Freestyle Skiing is trick skiing if you will. It involves performing various tricks while skiing, such as jumps, flips, and more. Freestyle skiing may be combined with downhill skiing or cross country skiing, but it is often done in parks that are set up for this special type of skiing.

Ski Jumping is more suited to competitive skiing. The skier gets up their speed on a small specially designed slope, and then makes the jump off the end of that slope. Turns and flips may be performed during the jump as well. Speed Skiing is also competition based skiing, where the objective is to have the best time running a course that has been set up.

Extreme Skiing is very dangerous, and only expert skiers should participate in extreme skiing. This is typically done on slopes that have at least a 45 degree angle. Skiing down the face of a mountain would be considered extreme skiing.

Kite Skiing is done while holding onto the control handles of a foil or inflatable kite. The kite is held in front of the skier, and the wind pulls the skier, often at high speeds. This is a type of skiing that is done in wide open spaces, and typically on a flatter surface, instead of on a slope.

Heli-Skiing Some people think that heli-skiing involves hanging onto a helicopter while skiing. This isnt the case. Heli-skiing simply means that a helicopter takes you to a specific location and you leave the helicopter and ski down the mountain. The helicopter is just the transportation to your starting point, however, most of the locations the helicopter will bring you too are challenging trails and slopes that are not accessible by other means.

Mono Skiing refers to the act of skiing on one ski, instead of on two skis. Both feet are attached to the one ski, with both feet being side by side on the board. Poles are used. Some people think that this is similar to snowboarding, and it is to an extent, but there are differences. For example, snowboarding is more like skateboarding, but on snow. The snowboarder stands sideways on the board, with the feet spread apart.