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How To Adopt The Infant Of Your Dreams

By Charles Hopkins Published 08/1/2007 | Parenting

A brief introduction letter often in the form of a checklist of a child's abilities and personality are sent out to the parents who are trying to give her infant up for adoption. For many years natural birth parents and adoptive parents have entered into written and verbal open adoptions. Although there is no way for the online site to warn you about all the problems you can face during the infant adoption process: however, there are experienced adoption professionals that feel that openness between the birth parents and adoptive parents, is the best way to open the lines of communication.

An adopted baby may take some characteristics from its adoptive parents, studies have shown that the longer you are around a person the more you tend to act like them and favor them. Children will, by nature, begin taking characteristics of their adopted parents once they have been around them for some time. After trying unsuccessfully for years, many couples decide to look into infant adoption.

Here are a couple of tips to help expectant and prospective adoptive parents navigate the maze of the adoption process: read all information thoroughly and get in touch with people who have been through the process. You will be amazed at what a simple Google search for "successful adoption parents" will yield. You will have plenty of time to figure out exactly what age and what background of the infant you would like most to adopt. Here are some reasons why some individuals choose to adopt: they are unable or incapable of giving birth using their own human processes or they would prefer to adopt versus give birth naturally, so to speak. By the way, working at an adoption agency doesn't even improve your chances of getting approved to adopt an infant.

Adoption can provide the type of life you want your child to experience if you are unable to give it to them, this is why some birth parents give up their child. Although there is no definitive source of data on the number or types of issues an infant may have, that should not keep anyone from going through the adoption process. A case in point is the minister who adopted a little girl from the State of Michigan. Though she was given a clean bill of health, she suffered from severe asthma. The emergency room and hospital bills were enormous. After making this known the State of Michigan reimbursed the minister for his medical expenses.

You really need to know the health history of the child however brief it may be for an infant. Strive to be more in depth, and create good timing. Some adoptive plans are more risky to prospective adoptive parents.